Meet Alice 2018-01-31T23:09:35+00:00

Meet Alice

Alice is a mom, wife, sister, friend, kayaker, youth group leader, and book-lover who has dedicated her 28-year career to improving the lives of children and families.  She decided to run for office after “finding her voice” during the #MeToo movement,  when she was quoted in the New York Times and appeared on MSNBC, where she called for politicians from both parties who mistreat women to step down immediately.

As Executive Vice President of Teach Plus, a nonprofit that engages, empowers, and elevates teachers as leaders, Alice recognizes teachers as the true experts on education.  She and her colleagues equip teachers for leadership roles in both the classroom and policy arena in ways that advance student success.

Alice’s career highlights include:

  • Working for the education committee in Congress, where Alice played a leading role in writing the historic 2009 law, Race to the Top, which was signed by President Obama and increased federal funding for public schools by over $4 billion — including an additional $250 million for Maryland public schools.  She was known on Capitol Hill as someone who works well with both Democrats and Republicans, and who brought people together to find solutions to policy problems.
  • Working at the Children’s Defense Fund, where Alice ran a national grassroots advocacy campaign that was instrumental in expanding the Children’s Health Insurance Program (CHIP) to an additional two million children.  CHIP provides coverage to nearly nine million children who were previously uninsured.
  • Working at the National Institute for Literacy, where Alice partnered with community leaders, teachers, and students to double funding for community literacy programs, allowing them to serve more students.

Alice is passionate about bringing people together. While working for Senator Paul Simon, she helped launch Everybody Wins When Adults Read with Children, a program that brings Members of Congress and congressional staffers to a local elementary school for weekly reading sessions (known as “Power Lunches”) with a student. Members of Congress get to see firsthand what is happening in local schools, and students get the extra help they need in mastering reading skills.  Alice also helped launch Walk a Mile in Your Sister’s Shoes, where Members of Congress agreed to live on a food stamp budget for month, while getting to know a constituent who lives on food stamps every month.  Policymakers who participated in this program and experienced firsthand the struggles of living on a limited income later saved a federal program from extinction that provides important supports to low-income families.

Last year, Alice was appointed by the Mayor and confirmed by the City Council to serve as a Commissioner on the Annapolis Education Commission.  As a Commissioner, she fights to reduce overcrowding in schools, keep great teachers in the classroom,  ensure all students have a safe way to and from school, and to align school hours with pediatrician recommendations for student health, well-being, and academic success. As an Elder at Christ Our Anchor Presbyterian Church, Alice supports a youth group that is 40 students strong. As a literacy volunteer and teacher, Alice prepared her students, including immigrants and refugees, for success on the high school equivalency exam. Alice graduated from Gettysburg College, attended Georgetown University for graduate school, and was awarded a public policy fellowship by Fulbright New Zealand.

Alice grew up in Maryland and has lived here most of her life.  She loves living in Annapolis with her husband, Frank, and their two sons. Their family has a long tradition of service.  Alice’s grandfather served in the U.S. Army in France in World War I and Frank’s father served in the South Pacific during World War II. The Cain family honors that service, and the service of so many others, through annual participation in the Ripley Race, a 5K road race to raise awareness and support for our men and women returning home from war. Alice’s father served one term in the U.S. Congress, where he voted for the Voting Rights Act of 1965, knowing that it would cost him re-election to his seat representing Oklahoma.  Until he died, he said that vote was “the best thing he ever did.” Alice is running in part because she knows from his example what public service, at its best, can be. She believes now is a time when our country needs public servants who will work to restore our trust in government.

Meet Alice

Alice is a mom, wife, sister, friend, kayaker, youth group leader, and book-lover who has dedicated her 28-year career to improving the lives of children and families.  She decided to run for office after “finding her voice” during the #MeToo movement,  when she was quoted in the New York Times and appeared on MSNBC, where she called for politicians from both parties who mistreat women to step down immediately.

As Executive Vice President of Teach Plus, a nonprofit that engages, empowers, and elevates teachers as leaders, Alice recognizes teachers as the true experts on education.  She and her colleagues equip teachers for leadership roles in both the classroom and policy arena in ways that advance student success.

Alice’s career highlights include:

  • Working for the education committee in Congress, where Alice played a leading role in writing the historic 2009 law, Race to the Top, which was signed by President Obama and increased federal funding for public schools by over $4 billion — including an additional $250 million for Maryland public schools.  She was known on Capitol Hill as someone who works well with both Democrats and Republicans, and who brought people together to find solutions to policy problems.
  • Working at the Children’s Defense Fund, where Alice ran a national grassroots advocacy campaign that was instrumental in expanding the Children’s Health Insurance Program (CHIP) to an additional two million children.  CHIP provides coverage to nearly nine million children who were previously uninsured.
  • Working at the National Institute for Literacy, where Alice partnered with community leaders, teachers, and students to double funding for community literacy programs, allowing them to serve more students.

Alice is passionate about bringing people together. While working for Senator Paul Simon, she helped launch Everybody Wins When Adults Read with Children, a program that brings Members of Congress and congressional staffers to a local elementary school for weekly reading sessions (known as “Power Lunches”) with a student. Members of Congress get to see firsthand what is happening in local schools, and students get the extra help they need in mastering reading skills.  Alice also helped launch Walk a Mile in Your Sister’s Shoes, where Members of Congress agreed to live on a food stamp budget for month, while getting to know a constituent who lives on food stamps every month.  Policymakers who participated in this program and experienced firsthand the struggles of living on a limited income later saved a federal program from extinction that provides important supports to low-income families.

Last year, Alice was appointed by the Mayor and confirmed by the City Council to serve as a Commissioner on the Annapolis Education Commission.  As a Commissioner, she fights to reduce overcrowding in schools, keep great teachers in the classroom,  ensure all students have a safe way to and from school, and to align school hours with pediatrician recommendations for student health, well-being, and academic success. As an Elder at Christ Our Anchor Presbyterian Church, Alice supports a youth group that is 40 students strong. As a literacy volunteer and teacher, Alice prepared her students, including immigrants and refugees, for success on the high school equivalency exam. Alice graduated from Gettysburg College, attended Georgetown University for graduate school, and was awarded a public policy fellowship by Fulbright New Zealand.

Alice grew up in Maryland and has lived here most of her life.  She loves living in Annapolis with her husband, Frank, and their two sons. Their family has a long tradition of service.  Alice’s grandfather served in the U.S. Army in France in World War I and Frank’s father served in the South Pacific during World War II. The Cain family honors that service, and the service of so many others, through annual participation in the Ripley Race, a 5K road race to raise awareness and support for our men and women returning home from war. Alice’s father served one term in the U.S. Congress, where he voted for the Voting Rights Act of 1965, knowing that it would cost him re-election to his seat representing Oklahoma.  Until he died, he said that vote was “the best thing he ever did.” Alice is running in part because she knows from his example what public service, at its best, can be. She believes now is a time when our country needs public servants who will work to restore our trust in government.

 

alice cain and family